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20131202
20131210
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MSNBCW 4
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MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 3:00pm PST
, i know from being a teenager in new york and the civil rights struggle going forward you were one of the first writers at "new york times" that really wrote about this movement. and for people to really understand the weight and gravity of nelson mandela, they have to understand what it was that he fought. give people a sense of what apartheid in south africa was and then how nelson mandela and the african national congress was able to break this gridlock of oppression and move this nation toward liberation. >> well, reverend al, i first went to south africa in 1985 which was one of the darkest times in the country where the apartheid regime was just wreaking havoc on black people in all of their townships. you know, the black people were isolated. they lived in townships that could easily be surrounded by the white and black in that case arms of the state. and this was a time when people were being beaten. they were being executed in all kinds of extralegal ways that we only learned about many years ago. with all kinds of poisons that their scientists, one doctor was a heart spec
MSNBC
Dec 3, 2013 3:00pm PST
, because the first weekend in july 50 years ago was when the civil rights act of 1964 was signed. >> wow. >> and so we will be back the first week in july 50 years later, and we will recommit ourselves to that purpose of that civil rights opportunity act. so we're excited. >> now, we got it's the 20th anniversary. it's going to be around voting 50 years after the civil rights act. but one thing that is always off the chain is the entertainment. but i said that there's no way you could beat last year because you had beyonce. but you did. we're announcing tonight you have prince next year. >> prince will headline our essence festival for 2014. he was our headliner ten years ago for the tenth anniversary, and he is back. we are honored, excited, and even more emboldened than ever that this will be the biggest party and will position us to achieve our purpose in 2014. >> as you look back as someone that wasn't around when essence was founded and you see where we are today in the midst of this is the middle of the second term of the first african-american president, you're hosting such a huge
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 3:00pm PST
these struggles were and how to fight opposition. i mean, i've been in the civil rights fight for the last several decades. and i remember the beginnings of the fight against apartheid here. robinson and gray and others who were castigated and attacked for that. and they were able to turn public opinion around. having to fight people like dick cheney and others who are now with these great eulogies on nelson mandela. >> that's right. i think people forget that. when people like you and mary francis berry were in the beginning of that fight, it was demonized and you were attacked for that. and it was not a popular position. and so i think there's a lot about the history that people. he oversimplifies everything. so does rush limbaugh. they don't care about what the facts are. that is here is a man who stood for justice, stood for freedom, stood for equality. we have a president who seems to -- i'm not saying he is nelson mandela, but he seems to be trying to accomplish some of the same things. >> karen finney, well, he's getting called some of the same names. thank you for your time tonight. be sur
MSNBC
Dec 9, 2013 3:00pm PST
a pivotal moment in civil rights history that happened on this day 60 years ago. the landmark brown versus the board of education decision of 1954 declared that separate public schools for black and white students were unconstitutional. an important part of that decision was the one that applied to washington, d.c. and six decades ago today two lawyers argued the washington, d.c. portion of the case. their argument, school segregation was a violation of liberty. the decision would have a direct impact on the first high school in the country, dunbar high school in washington, d.c. opened in 1870 and despite being segregated, it developed ground breaker after ground breaker. including george hayes. one of the lawyers who argued the case. and charles hamilton houston, the lawyer known as the man who killed jim crow. this year a great book chronicles the school in "first class: the legacy of dunbar, america's first black public high school." joining me now is the author allison stewart. allison, thanks for being here. >> i am thrilled to be here. >> let's start 60 years ago today. they argued
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4